The Mystery of the True Gospel

You likely know that ‘Gospel’ is Germanic (roughly, ‘God’s Speil’) for English Bibles, translating from Greek ”EUAGGLION’, literally “Good News.”

Beyond this there’s a great diversity of opinion concerning what the Gospel really was.

Complicating matters to an unimaginable degree is the fact that, sometime after Christ’s death, an enemy of the Teaching arrived, claimed to be converted to it, then promptly began preaching an utterly different Gospel.   This he claimed was revealed to him in a celestial vision.

The man of course was Saul (later Paul) of Tarsus.

Paul promptly disseminated his gospel widely.

He claims to have made an accommodation of his message, with that of the authentic original apostles.  However, there is much textual evidence in the New Testament to suggest quite strongly that the real situation was more complicated. Paul (who was accompanied by as many as two dozen associates) established a number of churches, after which the Jerusalem leaders (Peter, James and John, hereafter PJJ) investigated.

A contentions at this website is that the DIDACHE is the actual text which the PJJ co-wrote specifically in order to correct and forthrightly reverse the teachings   that is, the ‘gospel’    of Paul.

After a period of inter-apostolic conflict, matters grew even more troubled and the historical event murkier, in 66-70, when Jews in Palestine erupted in civil war. Roman legions arrived to quell the strife, resulting in widespread destruction. This was a watershed event which altered Christianity and Judaism ever after.

Sorting out what actually occurred, as opposed to a dubious and incomplete account in Scripture, has kept scholars engaged.

Part of the riddle is the strong likelihood that the canonical Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John) were written after A.D. 70, and therefore may reflect the then-thoroughly-changed situation, rather than the original Message and content.

This huge question-mark is put in a new light, however, by the rediscovery of the DIDACHE; for if it is as early as it appears to be (i.e., from around 49) then

is likely our most accurate historical text regarding the authentic Christian faith.

The stakes could hardly be greater!

This is why the DIDACHE is rather captivating, not only to believers who want to obey the Lord to our best ability, but to any historians interested in Christian origins.

The repercussions of the DIDACHE are enormous.  Not only can we derive historical revelations and corrective insights, but we also receive an extraordinarily powerful ‘witness’ of Christ from the very direct words of His closest intimates.  (Again, the canonical gospels are now regarded as ‘suspect’ by nearly all scholars, in the sense that they were written a generation later, by persons other than the apostles, and under the heavy influence of the catastrophe of 66-70.)

Above all, perhaps, we also receive a rather unvarnished and accurate representation of the True Word of Life, the True Gospel of God, without the ‘spin’ and likely adulterations which arguably afflicted the ‘mainstream gospels.’

In the DIDACHE, the implications are so epochal, its almost as if the LORD had planned for it to lie in obscurity, ‘sequestered,’ as it were, until this latter day.

You thus see how remarkable the DIDACHE discovery is.

By it, we can now recover and proclaim the True and everlasting Gospel again:

“And this gospel of the kingdom shall be proclaimed in all the world as a witness to all nations. And then the end shall come.”

Mat 24:14  

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One response to “The Mystery of the True Gospel

  1. Pingback: DIDACHE: Timeline « The DIDACHE-Gospel

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